Jiujitsu Training – May 29th

Yup, I’m being busy.

So How’d Class Go?
After the usual one-try-belt-tie (yes! can check that off the list) and warm-up, Tomari-sensei decided to confuse the white belts and have us blue belts brush up on our side-control submissions with; the americana, 2 versions of the kimura (called reverse ude-garami here in Japan, though Tomari-sensei also pointed out the BJJ term for the submission as well), AND 2 follow up submissions for the americana and 4 follow up submissions for the kimura if bottom tries to defend or fight or escape either submission.

It was pretty cool to see them all linked together and they were more practical than a lock-flow, because when it counts bottom side-control isn’t just gonna stay there on the mat trying to defend. They’re looking to escape too. The follow up submissions were great because when you’re first taking up jiu-jitsu most of the submissions you learn will have an escape. Once that escape happens, well, you give up on the submission and move on.

Not the case with the extra follow up techniques we learned. It was a glimpse into the thought process of rolling at a higher level. I’m gunning for this one submission, an escape looks like it’s happening, I’ll just cut ’em off with this, wait, still fighting it? Okay try escaping out of this. And if that fails I got one more for ya. It’s like a Marcelo Garcia mindset. Give ’em constant pressure. Attack, attack, attack. I liked it. A lot.

Hopefully, if I have the time and get someone to be a grappling dumming and get someone else to take pictures, I can do a proper write up and post them. If not I’ll just have to settle for posting my notes.

As an aside, my drilling partner was a single stripe white belt. I felt sorry for him. I’m really flexible on my left side so any americana and/or kimura attempt has got to be spot on. If not, I’ll look like I should be in pain but I’m actually okay and won’t even tap. Any attempt on my right arm and it’s tap-city. But, yeah, dude decided to try out my left side and he’d get frustrated and try multiple times to finish the submission. And to make matters worst I stepped on his hair and ripped out a good chunk of it on accident. I didn’t mean it but he went to the far end of the mat at the end of drilling. Sorry.

Finishing Thoughts
Paraestra Hakata is a scrappy school. I was reminded about it when I sat out for sparring, yet again, and watched from the sidelines.

For the first sparring match, I watched a tall lanky two stripe blue rolled with a purple belt. Obviously, a blue belt is going to step things up a notch when rolling with a purple. This guy went all out. I mean, homeboy was standing up, trying to do flying attacks on a kneeling opponent. When the purple stood up, the blue jumped guard and would start rocking himself to disrupt the balance of the purple belt while trying to slap on an ezekiel choke. Everything the blue belt did was crazy and 110%. It didn’t even end with the purple belt. When he rolled with a white belt, that two stripe blue still did flying attacks (mostly triangles) and cartwheels to pass guard.

And you know what. His technique sucked. For all his flash-in-the-pan moves, he was too dependant on his physical ability (if I rolled with him, I probably would have gotten submitted easily) that someone of the same size and strength (the white belt) was pretty much a match for him.

It made me realize how important technique and the physical attributes to apply those techniques on demand are in making progress in jiu-jitsu. Right now, I need more of both.

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